18 Phrases We Would Never Have Said In the ’80s

Here are 18 things people typically wouldn’t have said in the 1980s, reflecting how technology and culture have evolved since then. Have we advanced as a culture? The jury is out for some of these.

“Just screenshot it and send it to me.”

blonde woman with glasses looking shocked. Surprised.
Image credit: Cookie Studio via Shutterstock.

Screenshots didn’t exist as personal computers rarely had graphical interfaces in the early ’80s.

“I’ll Uber to your place.”

Uber. I
mage credit MOZCO Mateusz Szymanski via Shutterstock.

Uber and similar ride-sharing services did not exist; taxis were the primary option for hired rides.

“Let’s stream a movie tonight.”

VHS machine.
Image credit Sinisha Karich via Shutterstock.

Streaming services were non-existent; movies were watched on VHS tapes or cable.

“I need to charge my book.”

kindle reader.
Image credit Kaspars Grinvalds via Shutterstock.

E-books and e-readers like Kindle, which require charging, did not exist; physical books were the norm.

“Hold on, I’m getting a FaceTime call.”

Facetime.
Image credit Rocketclips, Inc. via Shutterstock.

Video calling, especially on personal devices like smartphones, was not available; traditional landline calls were the standard.

“I can’t go out, I’m binge-watching a series.”

shocked couple watching horror movie.
Image credit Prostock-studio via Shutterstock.

Binge-watching is a new phenomenon made popular by streaming platforms, which were not around in the ’80s.

“Check in on Facebook when you get there.”

Facebook messenger.
Image credit Kaspars Grinvalds via Shutterstock.

Facebook, and the concept of digital check-ins, were decades away from being developed.

“I’ll just order our groceries online.”

Online grocery shopping.
Image credit Atstock Productions via Shutterstock.

Online shopping was not feasible until the internet became widely accessible in the late ’90s and beyond.

“Did you see her latest post on Instagram?”

Instagram.
Image credit Kaspars Grinvalds via Shutterstock.

Instagram, and other social media platforms, were not around; sharing photos was done physically.

“I’ll send you the location pin.”

screen of phone.
Image credit Thx4Stock team via Shutterstock.

GPS technology was not available for public use, and digital maps like those on smartphones didn’t exist.

“Let’s watch the tutorial on YouTube.”

Youtube.
Youtube. Image credit NiP STUDIO via Shutterstock.

YouTube and similar video platforms were not around; learning usually involved books or in-person classes.

“I need to back up my data to the cloud.”

Cloud backup.
Image credit Rawpixel.com via Shutterstock.

Cloud storage was not an option; data was backed up on physical storage like floppy disks.

“I lost my phone.”

Girl with phone.
Image credit Lucky Business via Shutterstock.

Mobile phones were not commonly owned; losing one’s landline phone would be unusual and impractical.

“Download the app for that.”

Happy woman with curly hair using phone.
Image credit insta_photos via Shutterstock.

Apps, as we know them on smartphones and tablets, didn’t exist; software was often run from disks.

“My Fitbit says I need more steps today.”

Fitbit.
Image credit valiantsin suprunovich via Shutterstock.

Wearable technology such as fitness trackers were not in existence; health monitoring was not digitally tracked.

“Tweet me.”

Tweet.
Image credit Yalcin Sonat via Shutterstock.

Twitter, and the concept of tweeting, was not around; communication was done through phone calls, letters, or face-to-face.

“I’m listening to a podcast.”

Podcast.
Image credit David MG via Shutterstock.

Podcasts didn’t exist; radio shows were the closest equivalent.

“Let’s Zoom later.”

Zoom.
Image credit Kateryna Onyshchuk via Shutterstock.

Zoom and other video calling services were not available; video calls were a thing of science fiction.

What Else? Let Us Know!

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woman napping in hammock. Nap.
Image credit Olezzo via Shutterstock.

Isn’t it fascinating how our perspectives shift over time? While there are things we adored as kids that don’t hold the same charm now, the reverse is also true. Here are 18 things we couldn’t stand as children, but now embrace as adults. How many resonate with you? We must confess, we have a soft spot for naps…

READ: Think You’ve Grown? Check If These 18 Adult Favorites Were Your Kid Nightmares!

Why Not Having Kids Is Something You Should Seriously Think About

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Choosing to not have children is a significant decision that can impact various aspects of one’s life, from personal fulfillment and freedom, to financial stability and environmental considerations. This choice, often referred to as childfree living, is becoming increasingly recognized and respected as a valid lifestyle option. Here are several reasons why not having kids is something you should seriously think about.

Read: Why Not Having Kids Is Something You Should Seriously Think About

What We Can All Learn From Polyamorous Parents

Family and friends sitting at a dining table
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It’s been 10 years since journalist Jennifer Senior observed in her book All Joy and No Fun: The Paradox of Modern Parenthood that, according to many studies, parents aren’t happier than the child-free “and in certain cases are considerably less happy.” Since then, it doesn’t seem like much has changed for parents. READ: What We Can All Learn From Polyamorous Parents

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Author

  • Dede Wilson

    Dédé Wilson is a journalist with over 17 cookbooks to her name and is the co-founder and managing partner of the digital media partnership Shift Works Partners LLC, currently publishing through two online media brands, FODMAP Everyday® and The Queen Zone.

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